Al 7150-T7751 Stress-Strain and Fatigue Life Data

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Al 7150-T7751 Stress-Strain Data

This data came from a government report and is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service (NTIS), Springfield, Virginia 22161

The below information came from the Technical Report Documentation Page of the source:

Report Number: DOT/FAA/AR-MMPDS-01

Title and Subtitle: METALLIC MATERIALS PROPERTIES DEVELOPMENT AND STANDARDIZATION (MMPDS)

Report Date: January 2003

Authors: Richard C. Rice1, Jana L. Jackson1, John Bakuckas2, and Steven Thompson3

Performing Organization Name and Address:

1Battelle Memorial Laboratories 505 King Avenue Columbus, OH 43201

2FAA William J. Hughes Technical Center Materials and Structures Branch, AAR-450 Atlantic City International Airport, NJ 08405

3U. S. Air Force Research Laboratory Materials and Manufacturing Directorate Wright Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433

Contract or Grant Number: F33615-97-C-5647

Sponsoring Agency Name and Address: U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Aviation Administration Office of Aviation Research Washington, DC 20591


The below description and figures with captions come from the MMPDS report:

7150, a second-generation version of 7050, is an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-Zr alloy developed to provide higher strength properties than 7050 in thicknesses through 3 inches. 7150 is available in the form of plate and extrusion. The T77-type temper provides high strength with guaranteed toughness and corrosion resistance. The T77-type temper has exfoliation and stress-corrosion resistance comparable to the T76-type temper of the other 7000 series aluminum alloys. The properties of extrusions should be based upon the thickness at the time of quenching prior to machining. Selection of the mechanical properties based upon its final machined thickness may be unconservative; therefore, the thickness at the time of quenching to achieve properties is an important factor in the selection of the proper thickness column. For extrusions having sections with various thicknesses, consideration should be given to the properties as a function of thickness.

Figure 1: Typical tensile stress-strain curves for 7150-T7751 aluminum alloy plate at room temperature.
Figure 2: Typical compressive stress-strain and tangent-modulus curves for 7150-T7751 aluminum alloy plate at room temperature.
Figure 3: Typical tensile stress-strain curves for 7150-T77511 aluminum alloy extrusion at room temperature.
Figure 4: Typical compressive stress-strain and tangent-modulus curves for 7150-T77511 aluminum alloy extrusion.

Al 7150-T7751 Fatigue Life Data

This data came from a government report and is available for public release with unlimited distribution.

The below information came from the Report Documentation Page of the source:

Title: Mechanical Property Data on Aluminum Alloy 7150-T7751 Plate

Report Date: August 1990

Authors: Patrick W. Ertel1

Performing Organization Name and Address:

1University of Dayton Research Institute 300 College Park Avenue Dayton, OH 45469

Monitoring Oranization and Address: Wright Research and Development Center Materials Laboratory (WRDC/MLSD) Wright Patterson AFB, OH 45433-6533

Figure 5: Smooth and Notched Fatigue Data for Al7150-T7751 with Smooth Al7075-T651 Reference Curve.
Figure 6: Fatigue Crack Growth Rate Data for Al7150-T7751 L-T Orientation.
Figure 7: Fatigue Crack Growth Rate Data for Al7150-T7751 T-L Orientation.
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